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Edited by denizm75

Fun With English

Assign to a class (with edits).

All ten parts of Open University's fun History of English animated shorts combined :)

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via Ted-Ed:
"
When we talk about ‘English’, we often think of it as a single language. But what do the dialects spoken in dozens of countries around the world have in common with each other, or with the writings of Chaucer? Claire Bowern traces the language from the present day back to its ancient roots, showing how English has evolved through generations of speakers."

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via Ted-Ed:
"What is the difference between "a hearty welcome" and "a cordial reception"? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images."

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via Ted-Ed:
"All it takes is a simple S to make most English words plural. But it hasn't always worked that way (and there are, of course, exceptions). John McWhorter looks back to the good old days when English was newly split from German -- and books, names and eggs were beek, namen and eggru!"

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via Ted-Ed:
"What can spelling tell us about relationships between words? While spelling may sometimes seem random or unexpected, this lesson illuminates how peeling back the layers of spelling helps us understand the complex history and meaningful structure of words."

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via Ted-Ed:
"‘Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo’ is a grammatically correct sentence. How? Emma Bryce explains how this and other one-word sentences illustrate some lexical ambiguities that can turn ordinary words and sentences into mazes that mess with our minds."

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via Mental Floss:
"A weekly show where we endeavor to answer one of your big questions. This week, morgana7544 asks, 'Why are there silent letters in English words?'"

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via Mental Floss: "A weekly show where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John looks at the weird origins of 40 words such as "noon," "denim," and "mortgage.""

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via Mental Floss: "A weekly show where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John looks at the origins of 42 idioms such as, "once in a blue moon," "peeping Tom," and "silver lining.""

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via Oxford Dictionaries: "The history of the English language is summarized in our two-part series, from Anglo-Saxon to present day."

Posted by denizm75

via Oxford Dictionaries: "The history of the English language is summarized in our two-part series, from Anglo-Saxon to present day."

Posted by denizm75

via Oxford Dictionaries: "How do you count words? Ashley Wagner discusses the question as part of our video on the number of words in the English language."

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via OXford Dictionaries: "Our video explores the longest words in Oxford English Dictionary and OxfordDictionaries.com, as well as the longest place name in Britain."

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via OXford Dictionaries: "What's the longest word with just one syllable? Find out in our video"

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"December comes from the Latin word for "tenth." So then why is it our twelfth month?"

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"The most common vowel sound in English causes many spelling problems."

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"It's not "antidisestablishmentarianism" after all, and here's the short, sweet reason why."

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"One goose, two geese. One moose, two... moose. What's up with that?"

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